Homicide Rates / Reasons for ER Visits / Perception of Violence


Researching murder/homicide statistics for the latest Lance Priest / Preacher book.

Murder, in general, is down across the country over the last decade. Nationally, 4.7 people per 1,000 are killed in the U.S. each year (which by the way, is way more than most industrialized nations). That is down from 5.6 per 1,000 a decade ago.

Heck, Lance/Preacher kills twice that many in single chapters in his books. He’s like that.

FYI, Louisiana leads the nation with 10.8 per 1,000, while New Hampshire is the lowest at 1.1.

In looking into emergency room visits related to violence, it was interesting to see that injuries resulting from violence (stabbing, shooting, blunt trauma) do not make the top 20 on the list reported by the CDC.

Stomach pain, chest pain and fever continue to lead the way as reasons for ER visits.

All of this is indeed interesting on several levels. Gallup reports that violent crime is up slightly, while perception of violent crime remains about the same. Looking back at history, Americans feel violent crime is remaining fairly static. Perception of violence peeked back in 1990 & 1991. Rates started to rise again in the 2000s with the downturn in the economy.

Keep all this in perspective – I’m writing a chapter and book taking place in 1995.

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About Christopher Metcalf - Author

Christopher Metcalf is the author of Lance Priest / Preacher novels. Lance "Preacher" Priest is a spy, a killer, a human chameleon. He is the CIA's perfect weapon who lives by one simple rule -- there are no rules. Spies and Lies is a blog dedicated to espionage, the art and science of lying and occasional creative writing. www.christophermetcalf.com
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